Interview on Somatic Trauma Interventions

htc

On this day, September 11, when many of us remember the traumatic events in NYC, Washington DC and Pennsylvania, I am pleased to share an interview I did for the Present Moment PodcastOur discussion revolved mainly around the use of Integrative Psychotherapy and Somatic Experiencing Therapy for trauma healing highlighting where mindfulness interventions and somatic interventions align and depart; particularly when it comes to resolving physiological and psychological trauma responses. The Present Moment Podcast is produced by Ted Meissner, Online and Community Development Manager for the Center for Mindfulness at UMASS Medical School.

Listen here: https://presentmomentmindfulness.com/2017/09/09/episode-095-lisa-dale-miller-somatic-trauma-intervention/

Talks from the Buddhism and Modernity Symposium

On June 7, 2015, a select group of presenters from the Mindfulness and Compassion Conference at SFSU convened at the Mangalam Research Center in Berkeley to discuss Buddhism and Modernity. I chose to speak on Transcendent wisdom and psychotherapy. Below are videos of all three panels.

Panel 2: The role for the transcendent dimensions of Buddhist practice and teachings in a disenchanted world. Lisa Dale Miller (Psychotherapist), David Lewis (Independent Researcher), Jack Petranker (Mangalam Research Center). My talk begins at 8:22 in the video time sequence.

Panels 1 and 3 featured wonderful commentary on the problematic of modern mindfulness from academics and researchers working in the fields of philosophy, neuroscience and the social sciences.

Panel 1: Buddhist Philosophy and the Perennial Concerns of Western Philosophy
Stephen Jenkins (Humboldt State University), Steven Stanley (Cardiff University), and David Brazier (International Zen Therapy Institute).

 

Panel 3: How Insights from the Fields of Science Studies/History of Science/Continental Thought Might Shed New Light on the Dialogue Between Buddhism and Science. David McMahan (Franklin & Marshall College), Cliff Saron (University of California, Davis), Kin Cheung (Temple University), Geoffrey Samuel (University of Sydney), Linda Heuman (Brown University/John Templeton Fellow)

Researcher Norman Farb Cuts Through Mindfulness Hype

Just released is this timely in-depth lecture by Dr. Norman Farb, Associate Professor at University of Toronto, Canada given at the Oxford Mindfulness Centre, 11th March 2015. Norm is a serious, thoughtful, longtime mindfulness interventions researcher. Anyone who uses mindfulness in their clinical work needs to watch this.

 

Part Two Videos: A Dialogue with David Vago, PhD on the Clinical Relevance of Awakening

I recently recorded two rich and informative conversations with David Vago, PhD, associate psychologist in the Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory (FNL), Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and instructor at Harvard Medical School, focused on translating the Buddhist concept of “enlightenment” into modern clinical terms. David is currently involved in cutting edge neurobiological research on the awakened mind states that arise during various meditative practices. I have divided our second conversation into three videos featured below. You can also listen to Part Two in its entirety at: http://www.awakenedpresence.com/sounds/dlpart2.mp3

This first of Part Two’s three videos focuses on S-ART, David’s neurobiological framework for describing the positive effects of meditation on self-awareness, self-regulation, and self-transcendence. Covered topics include: Perception and distorted self-perception; clarity and insight; reducing mental and emotional suffering.

The second of Part Two’s three videos covers not-self: Theravada, Mahāyāna and Vajrayāna notions of awakening and not-self; secular mental training; different interventions for different psyches; selflessness/emptiness in psychotherapy; translating the dharma into neuropsychological terms, vedanā (craving and aversion); decentering.

This final Part Two video concludes our conversation on not-self: embodied cognition; aggregates and seeds of habit mind; other-centeredness and not-self; non-referential compassion; empathy fatigue; refuting self-compassion; clinical Tonglen practice; neurobiological evidence for not-self states; developmental model of awakening; dynamic responsiveness; neurotherapeutics.

Is awakening clinically relevant? Part One of my dialogue with David Vago

David Vago, PhD and I recently recorded two rich and informative conversations focused on translating the Buddhist psychological conceptualization of “enlightenment” into modern clinical terms. David is currently involved in cutting edge neurobiological research on the awakened mind states that arise during various meditative practices. This first part of our two-part conversation covered the following topics: contextualizing the terms enlightenment, awakening, liberation; demarcating clinical markers of progress on the path; Nirvana and mini-nirvanas; state vs trait changes of awakening; extinction of mental and emotional habits; dissolving greed, hatred and delusion; pure awareness or nature of mind; the inherent problems of quick fix mindfulness. Please enjoy! Part Two will be available in a week or two.

David Vago, PhD is an associate psychologist in the Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory (FNL), Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and instructor at Harvard Medical School. David has previously held the position of Senior Research Coordinator for the Mind & Life Institute and is currently a Mind and Life Fellow. David’s research interests broadly focus on utilizing translational models to identify and characterize neurobiological substrates mediating psychopathology, to better predict outcomes and potential biologically-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for those suffering with mental illness. David has been specifically investigating brain networks supporting self-awareness, self-regulation, and self-transcendence in order to clarify adaptive mind-brain-body interactions and their therapeutic relevance in psychiatric disorders. http://davidvago.bwh.harvard.edu/

An mp3 audio version of this discussion is available at http://www.awakenedpresence.com/sounds/dlpart1.mp3