Practicing Non-hatred in a Hate-filled World

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The practice of non-hatred may be the most difficult of the Buddhist precepts to apply as a Buddhist practitioner/householder living in a world characterized by a mass of human suffering arising from hatred, greed and ignorance. This talk had particular significance as it was delivered two weeks after the horrific events that transpired in Charleston. I consider this dharma talk a follow-up to my last talk on the Skillful Means of Recognizing Empty Appearance

Download this talk: Download mp3     
Listen to it on iTunes: iTunes podcast

Powerful “Stand Against Suffering” Statement Released

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Lion’s Roar has posted a powerful statement by thirteen leading Buddhist teachers, and 100 additional signatories, calling on Buddhists and all people of faith to take a stand against Trump Administration policies that will create suffering for the most vulnerable in American society. Read the statement here: https://www.lionsroar.com/stand-against-suffering/

Dharma talk on Fearlessness

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Fearlessness and intrepidity (the strength to carry on in spite of danger) feature quite prominently in Buddhist philosophy and Buddhist psychology. In fact, fearlessness is an oft-mentioned result of mental clarity, emotional equanimity and wakeful, embodied awareness. This talk fleshes out a few prominent teachings on intrepidity and how to apply them in daily life. Free download links to hear this talk are below.

Download mp3
iTunes podcast

The Ultimate Rx

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You can now download for free on Academia.edu The Ultimate Rx: Cutting through the delusion of self-cherishing, the chapter I authored for the newly published Handbook of Mindfulness: Culture, Context and Social Engagement.

Chapter Abstract:
Western and Buddhist psychologies acknowledge the significant role distorted self-narratives play in poor mental health. But these two disciplines hold divergent views on the utility of ‘cherishing the self’. Western psychology claims high self-esteem is a requirement for self-confidence, happiness, and success. Buddhist psychology asserts wisdom and compassion are the forerunners of genuine confidence and sustainable personal and collective well-being. It further states that endemic self-cherishing—the habitual reification of distorted hyper-egoic self-narratives—is a primary source of mental and emotional affliction. Yet, Buddhist psychology also affirms the innate capacity of all human beings to end the mental suffering of self-cherishing. This chapter explicates Western and Buddhist psychological models of self, Buddhist theories of not-self and conventional and ultimate self-cherishing, and outlines a somatopsychotherapeutic clinical approach for helping individuals struggling with depressive, anxious, trauma-related symptoms and addictions, to recognize self-cherishing mentation and lessen its deleterious effects.

Deluded and Undeluded Mind: Two new dharma talks

dharmatalkslogo2Listen to two dharma talks I recently delivered on Delusion and Non-delusion. 

Delusion and Deluded Mind
This first talk covers the Buddhist psychological description of how delusion manifests in human perception and its effects on collective and personal human suffering.

Download mp3               iTunes podcast

Non-delusion and Undeluded Mind
This second talk covers the Buddhist psychological description of how non-delusion manifests in human perception and practical steps for cultivating non-delusion in daily life.

Download mp3                 iTunes podcast

Talks from the Buddhism and Modernity Symposium

On June 7, 2015, a select group of presenters from the Mindfulness and Compassion Conference at SFSU convened at the Mangalam Research Center in Berkeley to discuss Buddhism and Modernity. I chose to speak on Transcendent wisdom and psychotherapy. Below are videos of all three panels.

Panel 2: The role for the transcendent dimensions of Buddhist practice and teachings in a disenchanted world. Lisa Dale Miller (Psychotherapist), David Lewis (Independent Researcher), Jack Petranker (Mangalam Research Center). My talk begins at 8:22 in the video time sequence.

Panels 1 and 3 featured wonderful commentary on the problematic of modern mindfulness from academics and researchers working in the fields of philosophy, neuroscience and the social sciences.

Panel 1: Buddhist Philosophy and the Perennial Concerns of Western Philosophy
Stephen Jenkins (Humboldt State University), Steven Stanley (Cardiff University), and David Brazier (International Zen Therapy Institute).

 

Panel 3: How Insights from the Fields of Science Studies/History of Science/Continental Thought Might Shed New Light on the Dialogue Between Buddhism and Science. David McMahan (Franklin & Marshall College), Cliff Saron (University of California, Davis), Kin Cheung (Temple University), Geoffrey Samuel (University of Sydney), Linda Heuman (Brown University/John Templeton Fellow)

Two New Dharma Talks on Non-attachment

I just delivered two talks on non-attachment—certainly the most misunderstood and maligned Buddhist ideal. Both are uploaded now and available for free download.

The first talk deconstructs the term into its various meanings and explores the philosophical implications of non-attachment and identity clinging through the Buddha’s teachings from the Pāli Canon and those of several modern-day Buddhist teachers.

The second talk focuses on the practical application of non-attachment in daily life. Together the Sangha and I explored various ways to cultivate non-clinging by transforming greed with equanimity, hatred with compassion, and delusion with clarity.

And you can hear both by following these links.
Talk #1: http://www.awakenedpresence.com/sounds/nonattachment1.mp3
Talk #2: http://www.awakenedpresence.com/sounds/nonattachment2.mp3