Interview on Somatic Trauma Interventions

On this day, September 11, when many of us remember the traumatic events in NYC, Washington DC and Pennsylvania, I am pleased to share an interview I did for the Present Moment Podcast. Our discussion revolved mainly around the use of Integrative Psychotherapy and Somatic Experiencing Therapy for trauma healing highlighting where mindfulness interventions and somatic... Continue Reading →

Trauma Therapist Project Interview

Psychologist Guy Macpherson interviewed me for the Trauma Therapist Project Podcast. We had a very rich conversation during which I shared experiences from my time in Kosovo shortly after the war ended in 2000 working with traumatized Albanian Kosovar children, and also the clinical integration of Buddhist psychology and and Somatic Experiencing Therapy that I currently offer patients. Enjoy! http://www.thetraumatherapistproject.com/podcast/lisa-dale-miller-lmft/

A new dharma talk on the Buddhist psychology of addiction

Listen now to a recording of a dharma talk I just gave on the Buddhist Psychology of Addiction. This talk was delivered at Marin Sangha on May 31, 2015.  I was asked to talk about this important topic by the Sangha members. The talk covers quite a bit of ground including childhood trauma and its physiological and... Continue Reading →

Missing link found between brain and immune system

A stunning discovery by UVA School of Medicine researchers finds the brain is directly connected to the immune system by lymphatic vessels previously thought not to exist, proving the brain has immune responses just like the rest of the body. This finding could have significant effects on  the study and treatment of neurological diseases ranging from autism to Alzheimer’s... Continue Reading →

The Intersection of Buddhist psychology and Somatic Experiencing Therapy

The Somatic Experiencing (SE) Trauma Institute has posted an interview with me, covering some basic principles of how to integrate SE’s psychobiological method for resolving trauma symptoms and chronic stress with a Buddhist psychological approach. Not surprisingly, these two methods have much in common: the use of mindful attending to external and internal stimuli and... Continue Reading →

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