Interview on Somatic Trauma Interventions

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On this day, September 11, when many of us remember the traumatic events in NYC, Washington DC and Pennsylvania, I am pleased to share an interview I did for the Present Moment PodcastOur discussion revolved mainly around the use of Integrative Psychotherapy and Somatic Experiencing Therapy for trauma healing highlighting where mindfulness interventions and somatic interventions align and depart; particularly when it comes to resolving physiological and psychological trauma responses. The Present Moment Podcast is produced by Ted Meissner, Online and Community Development Manager for the Center for Mindfulness at UMASS Medical School.

Listen here: https://presentmomentmindfulness.com/2017/09/09/episode-095-lisa-dale-miller-somatic-trauma-intervention/

Practicing Non-hatred in a Hate-filled World

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The practice of non-hatred may be the most difficult of the Buddhist precepts to apply as a Buddhist practitioner/householder living in a world characterized by a mass of human suffering arising from hatred, greed and ignorance. This talk had particular significance as it was delivered two weeks after the horrific events that transpired in Charleston. I consider this dharma talk a follow-up to my last talk on the Skillful Means of Recognizing Empty Appearance

Download this talk: Download mp3     
Listen to it on iTunes: iTunes podcast

New Dharma Talk: Empty Appearance

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Listen to a dharma talk I gave on August 8, 2017 at IMSB in Mountain View, Ca, on the topic of Skillfully Recognizing Empty Appearance. Though the Buddhist notion of emptiness can be quite challenging for Western Buddhist practitioners, the rich teachings on emptiness offer a clear path to apply wise view, wise action and skillful means in daily life. Enjoy!
Download mp3
iTunes podcast

Dharma talk on Fearlessness

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Fearlessness and intrepidity (the strength to carry on in spite of danger) feature quite prominently in Buddhist philosophy and Buddhist psychology. In fact, fearlessness is an oft-mentioned result of mental clarity, emotional equanimity and wakeful, embodied awareness. This talk fleshes out a few prominent teachings on intrepidity and how to apply them in daily life. Free download links to hear this talk are below.

Download mp3
iTunes podcast

The Ultimate Rx

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You can now download for free on Academia.edu The Ultimate Rx: Cutting through the delusion of self-cherishing, the chapter I authored for the newly published Handbook of Mindfulness: Culture, Context and Social Engagement.

Chapter Abstract:
Western and Buddhist psychologies acknowledge the significant role distorted self-narratives play in poor mental health. But these two disciplines hold divergent views on the utility of ‘cherishing the self’. Western psychology claims high self-esteem is a requirement for self-confidence, happiness, and success. Buddhist psychology asserts wisdom and compassion are the forerunners of genuine confidence and sustainable personal and collective well-being. It further states that endemic self-cherishing—the habitual reification of distorted hyper-egoic self-narratives—is a primary source of mental and emotional affliction. Yet, Buddhist psychology also affirms the innate capacity of all human beings to end the mental suffering of self-cherishing. This chapter explicates Western and Buddhist psychological models of self, Buddhist theories of not-self and conventional and ultimate self-cherishing, and outlines a somatopsychotherapeutic clinical approach for helping individuals struggling with depressive, anxious, trauma-related symptoms and addictions, to recognize self-cherishing mentation and lessen its deleterious effects.